From the blog

  • Fake news in conservation: Overfishing or over-reacting?  I remember the first thing I heard was that the local fish population was decimated. Some people even called the Paraguay River an empty river. The widespread belief was that the river had been devastated and that it was an area where local people impetuously harvested everything. [READ MORE]
  • The smell of a Jaguar’s breath and radicalism in conservation There is a saying in Brazil that nothing is more disgusting in the world than a jaguar’s breath. I was raised hearing that if I did not brush my teeth, I would have bad breath like a jaguar. So, when I was invited to participate in a jaguar capture in the Pantanal, Brazil, naturally I had to check it out to see if the stories were true. [READ MORE]
  • Breaking news! Conservation practice is actually positive (and so are conservationists) Conservationists are increasingly getting a bad reputation as moaners and pessimists. While this may not sound like important news, a less than flattering article by Mongabay argues that an increasingly bleak tone from conservationists could pose a real problem for conservation [READ MORE]

  • Hard earned lessons of fieldwork planning Preparing for fieldwork can be a steep learning curve. With that in mind, I asked a few colleagues what they wish they had been told before they started their fieldwork, and the responses ranged from the practical to the hilarious…[READ MORE]

  • Unnatural capital: Our internal conflict with natural capital The beginning of May saw the annual Earthwatch debate held at the Royal Geographic Society. Titled, ‘Does nature come with a price tag?’…[READ MORE]

  • Earth Hour: Armchair activism or winds of change? Climate change is not something of the future. It is here now, driven in part by rapid consumption of fossil fuels, deforestation and unsustainable agriculture….[READ MORE]

  • UK Government policy on badgers: Not so black and white! Badgers are an iconic part of the British countryside and culture. They are protected by their own act of parliament and have civil society groups dedicated to their conservation and welfare…[READ MORE]

  • Conservation and conflict; two sides of the same coin?Whilst the devastation of war and conflict can be most easily seen through its human casualties or destruction of cities, the environmental impacts are often left unreported…[READ MORE]

  • Playing chicken with conservation & climate change: Climate change is one of the planets biggest challenges. For conservation, it poses serious threats to our biodiversity. It alters habitats, increasing competition for space and resources as well as facilitating the spread of pests and diseases…[READ MORE]

  • Cecil, Aslan and the Samburu moran: He is the world’s most famous Lion. Since he was killed on July the 1st in a controversial trophy hunt in the Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe, Cecil has been plastered all over the media…[READ MORE]

  • Conservation legacy and the bits we leave behind: When was the last time you visited your ‘site’ or ‘study area’? Who did you talk to and who helped you? A recent blog by Pat Thompson, directed primarily at research students, but equally valid for conservation…[READ MORE]

  • Conservation and Controversy at the ICCB: The 2015 International Conference for Conservation Biology (ICCB) and the 4th European Congress for Conservation Biology (ECCB) was a mix of more than 900 talks…. [READ MORE]

  • Human Wildlife Conflict in the 21st Century: The word conflict is beaten around a lot these days and inevitably stirs up negative feelings. When you hear the word ‘conflict’, what do you immediately think of?…. [READ MORE]

  • Welcome to the Conservation Blog: Lets face it, the media can get us down at the best of times and especially when it comes to conservation. Poaching, climate change, and the destruction of habitats are frequently in the media…. [READ MORE]